/Get Inspired/Toronto Design Week 2018

Best of Design Week, Day 5: Felt Pockets, $100 Hamburgers & Super Chia Seeds

We’re out tagging the best products, designs and installations we encounter at the Toronto Design Offsite Festival (TO DO) and the Interior Design Show (IDS). Here’s our fifth dispatch from the wilds of Toronto


From January 15 to 21, we’re awarding 100 Designlines Loves tags to the most beautiful, most innovative, and flat-out wackiest stuff we encounter. Keep track of everything we tagged in our master list and share your stories with us using the hashtag: #DLLoves18. Happy trails!

Day Five of our Toronto Design Offsite Festival adventures brought our editors to far-flung corners of the city. At the Harbourfront Centre, we viewed three concurrent exhibitions displaying travelling objects, community art projects and Canadian-made jewellery. Dear Human impressed us with pulp pendants at the lakeside exhibition, and again with the meticulously designed Hangeraki at the Work/Life exhibition at Umbra on John Street.

Another editor visited three festival highlights in the west end. Sean Hazell’s Museum of Contemporary Work put a new spin on our daily grind, while Supermilk Studio suggested we should be paying (way) more for a hamburger at Easy Tiger. Finally, Marianne Ibrahim’s chia-powered sculpture captivated at CUTMR. The closing festival dance party, held in the Gladstone’s ballroom, was a fitting end to a week of power walking.


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